Here is a round-up of today’s news:

  • A patient is suspected of having Ebola in Brazil. The 47 year old man who arrived from Guinea on the 19th of September 2014 is currently in the city of Cascavel. His identity is unknown but authorities said he will be moved to a hospital in Rio de Janeiro and placed in isolation for observation and treatment. Health Officials are, as a precaution, trying to find all possible contacts.
  •  The Australian woman who was placed in isolation in a hospital in Cairns yesterday has tested negative for Ebola. Sue Kovack had returned from volunteering for the Red Cross in Sierra Leone. Hospital Officials said she would remain under observation for another 24 hours and follow-up tests would be done.
  • Two million voters who were meant to go to the polls next Tuesday to elect Liberia’s upper chamber have been told that elections have been suspended. Officials cite lack of polling staff, delay in necessary materials due to reduced flights, concerns about voter turnout and general health concerns related to the gathering of people in light of the Ebola Outbreak.
  • Staying in Liberia, one of the driver’s to the country’s Chief Justice has been placed in isolation after his wife passed away from what is suspected to be Ebola. The driver has allegedly not had any contact with the Justice for at least two weeks.
  • The Dallas Deputy who was placed in isolation after displaying symptoms similar to that of Ebola has been discharged from hospital. He had entered the apartment where index patient Thomas Eric Duncan had been living in order to obtain a quarantine order. He tested negative and has shown significant improvement in his health.
  • Temperature gauges and thermal cameras installed at Cairo’s Airport have proven to be defective. The Country’s Health Minister ordered an immediate investigation. Egypt is one of the world’s largest tourist destinations and is currently welcoming home many citizens who are returning from the Hajj pilgrimage.
  • The Economic Impact of Ebola has been largely forgotten in the fight against the epidemic. Countries that are heavily affected have lost significant parts of their economy due to a restless population, decline in transport and cost of treatment. In response to this the International Monetary Fund has loosened restrictions on borrowing. The IMF reiterated calls for humanitarian aid to assists countries most affected.
  • Medicins Sans Frontieres reported that The Donka Ebola treatment center in Conakry, Guinea has been pushed to the limit due to an increase in cases. The treatment facility is believed to have admitted 22 patients in one day. The fears are mounting that if the upward trend continues the center might be forced to turn people away. There was also a significant increase in the amount of children admitted.
  • Spokesperson for the North-West Department of Health in South Africa has said the 72 year old man suspected of having Ebola could not have the disease based on a Health Record. He said the casualty ward which was quarantined yesterday has returned to normal. The man was transferred to Tshepong Hospital Complex which is listed as an Ebola referral Hospital but later passed away from what is claimed to be a bacterial infection. Tests ruled out HIV, Congo Fever and Malaria. Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi later confirmed that there was no Ebola in South Africa but that the country was ready should that become a reality.
  • Zimbabweans were concerned after reports surfaced claiming a hospital was shut down in Harare for a suspected Ebola case. The woman turned out to have Malaria and things have since returned to normal.
  • A satirical piece written by the site NewsNerd claiming a vaccine that only worked on white skin was available has been taken seriously by many commentators. Despite the disclaimer distinctly saying it was false, many still took the opportunity to invoke racially inflammatory sentiments.
  • A man caused a ruckus when he sneezed on a plane and yelled out ‘I have Ebola’. He also claimed that he had recently been to Africa. It later emerged, upon isolation and testing, that he had never been to Africa, and tests confirmed he did not have the virus.